American Wintergreen – Gaultheria Procumbens: Snowberry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

American Wintergreen - Gaultheria Procumbens

In Chippewa, wini’sibugons’  meaning “dirty leaf”, American wintergreen is often called Eastern tea berry now. It’s edible and medicinal, but you have to mind the amount you use because the oil is toxic if overdosed. Similar to Aspirin, just a tsp of pure wintergreen oil is the equivalent of 21 and a half adult aspirins. American …

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Common Juniper – Juniperus Communis: Spicy Conifer of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Juniper - Juniperus Communis

In Chippewa, ga’gawan’dagisid meaning deceptive, common junipers “berries” aren’t as sweet as they appear. (I’m not actually sure that is why deceptive is the descriptive name.) But common juniper is still an edible and medicinal plant, especially popular in Northern Europe. In Haliburton, Ontario, you’ll find communis var. depressa Pursh. It’s been fairly common around here, especially …

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Cannabis – Cannabis Sativa: Weed of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Cannabis - Cannabis Sativa

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for hemp or cannibis? Here in Canada, cannabis is a legal (and hopefully decriminalized someday) edible, medicinal and industrial plant. In Haliburton, we even have our own pot shop Capturing Eden. It’s a December day as I post this, the 24th! Mary Christmas! When Haliburton Flora was compiled, there was …

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Queen Anne’s-lace – Daucus Carota: Carrot of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Queen Anne's-lace - Daucus Carota

In Ojibwe, okaadaak means carrot, and Queen Anne’s-lace is literally a carrot. It’s another likely garden escapee, naturalized to Haliburton, and a surprisingly edible and medicinal wild plant. (If you’re not possibly pregnant, anyway!) Edible Uses of Queen Anne’s-lace The whole plant smells distinctly of carrot. But the edible roots are white instead of orange. …

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Goldenrod – Solidago SPP.: Sun Medicine of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Goldenrod - Solidago SPP.

In Chippewa, gi’ziso’muki’ki, goldenrod is a sunny medicinal and edible wild plant. In the past, it was falsely blamed for hayfever allergies, which are actually caused by ragweed. It’s really a medicine to treat allergies! Latin solidare means to join or make whole, and when you come upon the medicinal tags below you’ll see why …

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Balsam Fir – Abies Balsamea: Most Resin-ating of Local Foraged Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Balsam Fir - Abies Balsamea

In Chippewa, a’ninandak’, balsam fir is an edible and mostly medicinal tree that’s the closest local plant to frankincense that I know of, scent-wise. (But it’s not a sedative.) Its resin can also be used to make Balm of Gilead, mentioned in poplar posts. A little ecological history: When the fight against eastern spruce budworm vs …

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