Pearly Everlasting – Anaphalis Margaritacea: Moonshine of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Pearly Everlasting - Anaphalis Margaritacea

In Chippewa, wa’bigwun meaning “flowers”, pearly everlasting is a unique looking edible and medicinal plant. While not used much these days for food or medicine, it’s still a hit for American Lady butterflies and florists alike. Pearly everlasting (anaphalis margaritacea) is especially common along roadsides and damp ditches. It’s named for its pearly colored flower …

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Speedwells – Veronica SPP.: Green Tea of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Speedwells - Veronica SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for speedwell? Marsh speedwell is the main native speedwell you’ll find here, but we have quite a few species creeping around Ontario. All are edible and medicinal wild plants. Around Haliburton, the most common speedwells are marsh speedwell (veronica scutellata) and thyme-leaved speedwell (veronica serpyllifolia). I most often spot …

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Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia Hirta: Easily-sown of Medicinal Wild Plants

Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia Hirta

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin word for black-eyed Susan? While not edible like most plants we’ve featured, this medicinal herb is a butterfly favorite that is so easy to plant. It adds bountiful pops of sunny yellow to meadows and path sides. For the most part I’m covering plants that are both edible and medicinal, …

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Mountain-Ashes – Sorbus SPP.: Rose Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Mountain-Ashes - Sorbus SPP.

In Ojibwe, makominagaawanzh, mountain ash isn’t a true ash tree, but a rose family tree. It’s one of a few edible and medicinal plants with berries that look like tiny apples. Sorb apples for short. When Haliburton Flora was compiled, mountain ash (sorbus Americana) was fairly common on wet or moist lakeshores, and roadsides with shrubs …

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Salsifies – Tragopogon SPP.: Oyster of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Salsifies - Tragopogon SPP.: Oyster of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for salsifies? This edible and medicinal plant is like a tall, fluffier version of dandelion. It’s a non-native plant in Ontario and part of the sunflower family. In the reference book Haliburton Flora you’ll only find goatsbeard (tragopogon dubius), better called yellow salsify (there are unrelated plants called goatsbeard). …

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Ragweed – Ambrosia Artemisiifolia: Sneeziest of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Ragweed – Ambrosia Artemisiifolia: Sneeziest of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for ragweed? This maligned plant while rare-ish in Haliburton and considered a “weed” in this part of Ontario is actually native to North America. It’s at least as valuable to a wide swath of wildlife (mainly pollinators) as it is likely to cause a human to sneeze. You might …

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