Alternate-leaved Dogwood – Cornus Alternifolia: Bee Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Alternate-leaved Dogwood - Cornus Alternifolia

In Chippewa,  muj’omij meaning “moose plant”, alternate-leaved dogwood is one of our many cornus spp. Dogwoods aren’t just edible and medicinal, nor just for the moose. They are one of the main allies of our native bees. Alternate-leaved dogwood (cornus alternifolia) is common in central Ontario, especially around forest edges. Its relation red osier dogwood (cornus …

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Speedwells – Veronica SPP.: Green Tea of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Speedwells - Veronica SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for speedwell? Marsh speedwell is the main native speedwell you’ll find here, but we have quite a few species creeping around Ontario. All are edible and medicinal wild plants. Around Haliburton, the most common speedwells are marsh speedwell (veronica scutellata) and thyme-leaved speedwell (veronica serpyllifolia). I most often spot …

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Christmas Fern – Polystichum Acrosthichoides: Evergreen Fern of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Christmas Fern - Polystichum Acrosthichoides

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for Christmas fern? We have a few edible and medicinal ferns in central Ontario, although ostrich fern is the most popular for fiddleheads. Oh, Merry Christmas fern! Christmas fern (polystichum acrosthichoides) may be common in deciduous or mixed woods around Haliburton, Ontario, usually in damp hummus. It’s this areas …

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Partridge-berry – Mitchella Repens: Uterine Tonic of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Partridge-berry Mitchella Repens

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for partridge-berry? Not to be confused with wintergreen or cranberries, also sometimes called partridgeberries, or for lingonberry. Partridge-berries are an edible and medicinal evergreen vine, non climbing, with double-berry fused red fruits. The leaves have white veins. Partridge-berry (mitchella repens) is common around Haliburton, Ontario. The first specimen I …

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American Bittersweet – Celastrus Scandens: Our 100th Featured Wild Plant

American Bittersweet - Celastrus Scandens

In Chippewa, bima’kwud meaning “twisting around”, American bittersweet is much less edible and medicinal than our usual featured plants, but the berries on this vine are stunning in the fall and winter. Cheers to our 100th plant! Is it bittersweet? Yes and no. Is it very edible and medicinal? Nah. The berries are poisonous, although that’s …

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Mountain-Ashes – Sorbus SPP.: Rose Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Mountain-Ashes - Sorbus SPP.

In Ojibwe, makominagaawanzh, mountain ash isn’t a true ash tree, but a rose family tree. It’s one of a few edible and medicinal plants with berries that look like tiny apples. Sorb apples for short. When Haliburton Flora was compiled, mountain ash (sorbus Americana) was fairly common on wet or moist lakeshores, and roadsides with shrubs …

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