Ghost Pipe – Monotropa Uniflora: Edible & Medicinal Uses of That’s Not a Mushroom of Wild Plants

Ghost Pipe - Monotropa Uniflora

Ghost pipes are an herb most will mistake for a mushroom. This pale wildflower has forgone photosynthesis and can often be found in the darkest woods. It’s one of the many edible and medicinal plants that should probably be left alone due to being rarer and in this case, especially hard to propagate. There are …

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Mint – Mentha SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Freshest of Wild Plants

Mint - Mentha SPP.

We’ll cover the edible and medicinal wild mint, peppermint and spearmint in this post. There are other mints I will cover separately: heal-all, catnip, wild bergamot, etc.! Wild mint (mentha arvensis) and peppermint (mentha x piperita) are listed in Haliburton Flora, with the native wild aka corn mint being more common. Spearmint, called the mother …

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Pineapple-weed – Matricaria Discoidea: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Wild Chamomile of Wild Plants

Pineapple-weed - Matricaria Discoidea

Also called wild chamomile, which is more alluring on the medicinal side of naming. I suppose “pineapple” triggers a thirst for learning about its edible qualities. I would rather have titled this one Wild Chamomile, but I’m using the common names as seen in our local guidebook Haliburton Flora. Eventually, we will cover the popular …

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Highbush Cranberry – Viburnum Trilobum: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Sour Patch of Wild Plants

Highbush Cranberry - Viburnum Trilobum

In Ojibwe, aniibimin. Not a true cranberry, highbush cranberry is just as tart. It’s related to blueberries. Sometimes it’s called viburnum opulus var. americanum (trilobum). Opulus is the European relation, commonly called “guelder rose” in those parts. Our county is full of maple leafed looking plants. For instance, the literal maple-leaved viburnum (viburnum acerifolium). Highbush has …

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Basswood – Tilia Americana: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Bee Tree of Wild Plants

Basswood - Tilia americana

In Chippewa, wigub’imij, basswood is also called bee-tree, lime-tree, and linden*. It’s an amazing woodcarving material, and those familiar with just that aspect might be surprised at basswood’s edible and medicinal qualities! Plus, bees! *It’s not the same tree as European Linden but the uses are mirrored. Bee lovers, hear, hear – Basswood blooms are …

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Red Clover – Trifolium Pratense: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Honey of Wild Plants

Red clover - Trifolium pratense

In Ojibwe, nisoobag+oon ezhi-wadong+in, red clover is honeylicious and this edible and medicinal plant is not just for honey bees! My favorite folk name for red clover is honey/honey-stalks, but it isn’t just honey bees that like this honey. Mammals like the opossum, snowshoe hare, eastern chipmunk, raccoon, striped skunk, and white-tailed deer are buzzing …

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