Common Mallow – Malva SPP.: Meringue of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Mallow - Malva SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for mallow? Related to marsh mallows, the malva spp. of mallow around Haliburton isn’t native. But it is an edible and medicinal wild plant with similar uses to the more popular marshmallow. Common mallow (malva neglecta) is rare around Haliburton. You’re much more likely to find white or pink …

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Honeysuckles – Lonicera SPP.: Nectar of Edible & Medicinal Plants

Honeysuckles - Lonicera SPP.

In Ojibwe, ozaawaaskined, honeysuckles are sometimes edible and sometimes medicinal. But always a favorite of nectar seekers like the ruby-throated hummingbird along with all-stars like scarlet bee balm and cardinal flower. Some human folks seek the nectar too. The most abundant native honeysuckle here is American/Canadian Fly (lonicera canadensis), which likes openings in deciduous and mixed …

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White Water-Lily – Nymphaea Odorata: Lotus of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

White water-lily – Nymphaea odorata

Does anyone have an eastern Anishinaabe name for white water lily? One of the central names is odite’abug wabi’gwun. White water-lily is one of our stand out edible and medicinal aquatic plants. The flower itself is widely recognizable – a lotus. Around Haliburton we have white water-lily (nymphaea odorata) and the yellow ones you spot …

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Evening Primrose – Oenothera Biennis: Midnight Oil of Foraged Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Evening primrose - Oenothera biennis

If anyone knows an Anishinaabemowin word for evening primrose, please comment! While not a true “primrose”, common evening primrose is truly amazing. You might have heard of evening primrose oil as a medicinal supplement, but this foraged wild plant is also amazingly edible! The flowers open at dusk hence the “evening”. Observe them and you’ll …

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Basswood – Tilia Americana: Bee Tree of Foraged Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Basswood - Tilia americana

In Chippewa, wigub’imij, basswood is also called bee-tree, lime-tree, and linden*. It’s an amazing woodcarving material, and those familiar with just that aspect might be surprised at basswood’s edible and medicinal qualities! Plus, bees! *It’s not the same tree as European Linden but the uses are mirrored. Bee lovers, hear, hear – Basswood blooms are …

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