Bittercresses – Cardamine SPP.: Pepper Root of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Bittercresses - Cardamine SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for bittercresses? Bittercresses are in the mustard family and include toothworts. The Latin name “kardamine” means water or pepper grass. The folk name “pepper root” tells what this edible wild plant tastes like. Bittercresses (cardamine SPP.) like the twoleaf toothwort in our pictures here (cardamine diphylla syn. dentaria diphylla) …

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Giant Hyssops – Agastache SPP.: Hummingbird Mint of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Giant Hyssops - Agastache SPP.

In Chippewa, weza’wunuckwuk meaning “yellow plant”, referring to yellow giant hyssop, we have a few native agastache in Ontario. Rarely seen in the wild, they are a popular addition to pollinator gardens and they also have edible and medicinal uses for humans! Giant hyssops (agastache SPP.) are absent from Haliburton Flora although a few are native …

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Avens – Geum SPP.: Chocolate Root of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Avens - Geum SPP.

In Ojibwe, wica’wasa’konek meaning “yellow light” is one word for an avens, specifically large-leaved avens. Our chocolatey title is after the edible usage of the purple avens. We’ve got many avens in Ontario, Canada! Avens (geum spp.) are in the rose family, closely related to cinquefoils and strawberries. In milder climates they are evergreen. Our fairly …

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Boneset – Eupatorium Perfoliatum: Underrated of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Boneset - Eupatorium Perfoliatum

In Chippewa, niya’wibukuk. In Plants Have So Much To Give another Ojibway name is given, ogaakananiibiish meaning “shield and lance plant”. Boneset is a slightly edible and mainly medicinal plant. It’s also an underrated addition to pollinator gardens. Boneset (eupatorium perfoliatum) was common in damp areas when Haliburton Flora was compiled. However, I don’t see it …

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Alternate-leaved Dogwood – Cornus Alternifolia: Bee Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Alternate-leaved Dogwood - Cornus Alternifolia

In Chippewa,  muj’omij meaning “moose plant”, alternate-leaved dogwood is one of our many cornus spp. Dogwoods aren’t just edible and medicinal, nor just for the moose. They are one of the main allies of our native bees. Alternate-leaved dogwood (cornus alternifolia) is common in central Ontario, especially around forest edges. Its relation red osier dogwood (cornus …

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Speedwells – Veronica SPP.: Green Tea of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Speedwells - Veronica SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for speedwell? Marsh speedwell is the main native speedwell you’ll find here, but we have quite a few species creeping around Ontario. All are edible and medicinal wild plants. Around Haliburton, the most common speedwells are marsh speedwell (veronica scutellata) and thyme-leaved speedwell (veronica serpyllifolia). I most often spot …

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