Common Juniper – Juniperus Communis: Spicy Conifer of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, ga’gawan’dagisid meaning deceptive, common junipers “berries” aren’t as sweet as they appear. (I’m not actually sure that is why deceptive is the descriptive name.) But common juniper is still an edible and medicinal plant, especially popular in Northern Europe. In Haliburton, Ontario, you’ll find communis var. depressa Pursh. It’s been fairly common around here, especially …

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Common Elderberry – Sambucus Canadensis: Pharmacy of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for elder? Common elderberry is possibly the epitome of edible and especially of medicinal wild plants. If I had to pick one, elder is The One. Its been called “a medicine chest of its own” and “a pharmacy of its own”. I’m excited to finally cover elderberry! I use …

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Tamarack – Larix Laricina: Sweet Gum of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, mu’ckigwa’tig, meaning “swamp tree”, tamarack is common in low, damp areas, treed bogs (especially fens) and shore banks. If you’ve read about other trees here on the Song of the Woods blog and you’re expecting a lot, you won’t be disappointed. When I moved up north I was surprised to see an “evergreen” (it’s …

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Red Osier Dogwood – Cornus Stolonifera: Substitute Willow of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Joe from *Creator’s Garden calls it mskwabiimnagohns. Red osier dogwood is our most recognizable dogwood. It’s both a wild edible and a medicinal that you may be aching to know. *Link is to Joe’s video about red osier on Facebook, have a listen and follow 🙂 Our local dogwoods include at least five: pagoda (cornus …

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Evening Primrose – Oenothera Biennis: Midnight Oil of Foraged Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

If anyone knows an Anishinaabemowin word for evening primrose, please comment! While not a true “primrose”, common evening primrose is truly amazing. You might have heard of evening primrose oil as a medicinal supplement, but this foraged wild plant is also amazingly edible! The flowers open at dusk hence the “evening”. Observe them and you’ll …

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