Currants – Ribes SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Tiny Tart Berry of Wild Plants

Currants – Ribes SPP.

In Chippewa, cigagwa’tigon meaning “skunk-like”, refers to swamp red currant, one of our native currants around Ontario. These edible and medicinal plants aren’t the same “currant” you find dried in grocery stores. Currants (ribes spp.) are spattered everywhere around Haliburton county, Ontario. Gooseberry was covered earlier this year and is also a ribes. But here we’re …

Read more

Winterberry Holly – Ilex Verticillata: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Ornamental “Berry” of Wild Plants

Winterberry Holly - Ilex Verticillata

Winterberry holly is a stunning ornamental vine, but not so edible and medicinal. However, we’re trying to be festive this December, so let’s bump this feature up in the spirit of winter holidays. This is a plant to consider mainly for its looks and for crafting reasons, like wreaths. Winterberry holly (ilex verticillata) is fairly …

Read more

Prickly Gooseberry – Ribes Cynosbati: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Spiky Berry of Wild Plants

Prickly Gooseberry - Ribes Cynosbati

In Chippewa,  micidji’minaga’wunj meaning “fuzzy fruit”, prickly gooseberry is a fuzzy wild currant. Spiky is more apt. Despite the soft flexible spikes on the fruit, it’s an edible and medicinal wild plant. And native to Ontario. There are many ribes spp. to feature from Ontario. A couple are gooseberries. Prickly gooseberry (ribes cynosbati) is the common …

Read more

Staghorn Sumac – Rhus Typhina: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Lemonade Tree of Wild Plants

Staghorn sumac - Rhus typhina

In Ojibwe, baakwaanaatig, mainly referring to the berry, staghorn sumac is the “lemonadiest” and most vinegary of edible and medicinal shrubs. Staghorn sumac has been called the vinegar tree and the lemonade tree as its juice can be used as a substitute for vinegar or lemon juice. The “staghorn” part comes from the velvety branches …

Read more