Cannabis – Cannabis Sativa: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Weed of Wild Plants

Cannabis - Cannabis Sativa

Here in Canada, cannabis is a legal (and hopefully decriminalized someday) edible, medicinal and industrial plant. In Haliburton, we even have our own pot shop Capturing Eden. It’s a December day as I post this, the 24th! Mary Christmas! When Haliburton Flora was compiled, there was one cannabis sativa noted on waste ground up in …

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Evening Primrose – Oenothera Biennis: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Midnight Oil of Wild Plants

Evening primrose - Oenothera biennis

While not a true “primrose”, common evening primrose is truly amazing. You might have heard of evening primrose oil as a medicinal supplement, but this foraged wild plant is also amazingly edible! The flowers open at dusk hence the “evening”. Observe them and you’ll notice flowers hanging on in the morning that are wilted and …

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Lowbush Blueberry – Vaccinium Angustifolium: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Super Berry of Wild Plants

Lowbush blueberry - Vaccinium angustifolium

In Chippewa, minaga’wunj, blueberry. Lowbush (also called “low sweet”) blueberry is common here, as is velvet-leaf blueberry (vaccinium myrtilloides) which thrives around marshes. I’ve heard a few personal anecdotes from locals about picking blueberries all the while watching a black bear or bears doing the same nearby. The shorter species of “vaccinium” are cranberries and …

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Red Clover – Trifolium Pratense: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Honey of Wild Plants

Red clover - Trifolium pratense

In Ojibwe, nisoobag+oon ezhi-wadong+in, red clover is honeylicious and this edible and medicinal plant is not just for honey bees! My favorite folk name for red clover is honey/honey-stalks, but it isn’t just honey bees that like this honey. Mammals like the opossum, snowshoe hare, eastern chipmunk, raccoon, striped skunk, and white-tailed deer are buzzing …

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Common Mullein – Verbascum Thapsus: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Coziest Wild Plant

Common mullein - Verbascum thapsus

In Anishinaabemowin, mullein is sometimes called Waabooyaanibag (blanket leaf). Its uses are blanketly more medicinal than edible. But you can eat the delicate yellow flowers too! Mullein’s folk names include but are not limited to flannel leaf (leaves stuffed in shoes for warmth), tinder plant/torches/torch-wort, candlewick (dried stems used to be dipped in wax to …

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