Partridge-berry – Mitchella Repens: Uterine Tonic of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Partridge-berry Mitchella Repens

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for partridge-berry? Not to be confused with wintergreen or cranberries, also sometimes called partridgeberries, or for lingonberry. Partridge-berries are an edible and medicinal evergreen vine, non climbing, with double-berry fused red fruits. The leaves have white veins. Partridge-berry (mitchella repens) is common around Haliburton, Ontario. The first specimen I …

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American Wintergreen – Gaultheria Procumbens: Snowberry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

American Wintergreen - Gaultheria Procumbens

In Chippewa, wini’sibugons’  meaning “dirty leaf”, American wintergreen is often called Eastern tea berry now. It’s edible and medicinal, but you have to mind the amount you use because the oil is toxic if overdosed. Similar to Aspirin, just a tsp of pure wintergreen oil is the equivalent of 21 and a half adult aspirins. American …

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Catnip – Nepeta Cataria: Nightcap of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Catnip - Nepeta Cataria

In Chippewa, gajugens’ibug meaning “little-cat leaf”, catnip isn’t native to Ontario, but at least it’s not aggressive. It’s a surprisingly useful edible and medicinal plant, if you’re not pregnant. And whether or not you’re a cat. Catnip (nepeta cataria) is uncommon around Haliburton, but I find it around old farmsteads. It may also show up …

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Blue Cohosh – Caulophyllum Thalictroides: Woman’s Ally of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Blue Cohosh - Caulophyllum Thalictroides

In Chippewa, be’cigodji’biguk meaning one root, blue cohosh is similar to its name twin black cohosh, but from a whole other genus of plants. They aren’t look-a-likes, but their medicinal uses are similar. “Cohosh” is from an Algonquin word related to pregnancy/women. Both cohoshes are species at risk of overharvest. Presently, motherwort is a more sustainable choice …

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Common Juniper – Juniperus Communis: Spicy Conifer of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Juniper - Juniperus Communis

In Chippewa, ga’gawan’dagisid meaning deceptive, common junipers “berries” aren’t as sweet as they appear. (I’m not actually sure that is why deceptive is the descriptive name.) But common juniper is still an edible and medicinal plant, especially popular in Northern Europe. In Haliburton, Ontario, you’ll find communis var. depressa Pursh. It’s been fairly common around here, especially …

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Common Fleabane – Erigeron Philadelphicus: Early Old Man of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Fleabane – Erigeron philadelphicus

Does anyone have a Anishinaabemowin word for common fleabane? These edible and medicinal fleabane are smaller daisies, that bloom earliest of daisies here, and they are quickly raggedly looking. From all that you can probably figure out why they’re called eri (early) and geron (old man) in greek. Around Haliburton, we have common fleabane, rough daisy …

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