Ground Ivy – Glechoma Hederacea: Houseplant of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Ground Ivy - Glechoma Hederacea

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for ground ivy? Ground ivy is a nonnative (to Ontario) edible and medicinal plant that you can easily grow in a pot indoors if you love it, rather than have it take over yours and your neighbors lawns. Called gill-over-the-ground in Haliburton Flora, ground ivy (glechoma hederacea syn. nepeta …

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Alternate-leaved Dogwood – Cornus Alternifolia: Bee Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Alternate-leaved Dogwood - Cornus Alternifolia

In Chippewa,  muj’omij meaning “moose plant”, alternate-leaved dogwood is one of our many cornus spp. Dogwoods aren’t just edible and medicinal, nor just for the moose. They are one of the main allies of our native bees. Alternate-leaved dogwood (cornus alternifolia) is common in central Ontario, especially around forest edges. Its relation red osier dogwood (cornus …

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Prickly Gooseberry – Ribes Cynosbati: Spiky Berry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Prickly Gooseberry - Ribes Cynosbati

In Chippewa,  micidji’minaga’wunj meaning “fuzzy fruit”, prickly gooseberry is a fuzzy wild currant. Spiky is more apt. Despite the soft flexible spikes on the fruit, it’s an edible and medicinal wild plant. And native to Ontario. There are many ribes spp. to feature from Ontario. A couple are gooseberries. Prickly gooseberry (ribes cynosbati) is the common …

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Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia Hirta: Easily-sown of Medicinal Wild Plants

Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia Hirta

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin word for black-eyed Susan? While not edible like most plants we’ve featured, this medicinal herb is a butterfly favorite that is so easy to plant. It adds bountiful pops of sunny yellow to meadows and path sides. For the most part I’m covering plants that are both edible and medicinal, …

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Yellow Birch – Betula Alleghaniensis: Wintergreen Tree of Edible & Medicinal Plants

Yellow Birch - Betula Alleghaniensis

In Ojibwe, wiinizik, yellow birch has a lot in common with other birches, but along with black/sweet birch (which isn’t in Haliburton) yellow birch has a subtle wintergreen scent and taste, making it one of the few wintergreen-y edible and medicinal plants around Haliburton. Yellow birch is common around Haliburton in tall mixed woods. I notice …

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Canada Plum – Prunus Nigra: Scorned of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Canada plum – Prunus nigra

In Ojibwe, bagesaanaatig means plum tree. This edible and medicinal plum tree used to be widespread throughout Ontario. The stones were dropped along trails and around villages, wrapping the world in a plum thicket. But now Canada plum is uncommon here, which is surprising as wildlife loves to gobble up the fruit, so you’d think it …

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