Pearly Everlasting – Anaphalis Margaritacea: Moonshine of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Pearly Everlasting - Anaphalis Margaritacea

In Chippewa, wa’bigwun meaning “flowers”, pearly everlasting is a unique looking edible and medicinal plant. While not used much these days for food or medicine, it’s still a hit for American Lady butterflies and florists alike. Pearly everlasting (anaphalis margaritacea) is especially common along roadsides and damp ditches. It’s named for its pearly colored flower …

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Alternate-leaved Dogwood – Cornus Alternifolia: Bee Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Alternate-leaved Dogwood - Cornus Alternifolia

In Chippewa,  muj’omij meaning “moose plant”, alternate-leaved dogwood is one of our many cornus spp. Dogwoods aren’t just edible and medicinal, nor just for the moose. They are one of the main allies of our native bees. Alternate-leaved dogwood (cornus alternifolia) is common in central Ontario, especially around forest edges. Its relation red osier dogwood (cornus …

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Common Mallow – Malva SPP.: Meringue of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Mallow - Malva SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for mallow? Related to marsh mallows, the malva spp. of mallow around Haliburton isn’t native. But it is an edible and medicinal wild plant with similar uses to the more popular marshmallow. Common mallow (malva neglecta) is rare around Haliburton. You’re much more likely to find white or pink …

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Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia Hirta: Easily-sown of Medicinal Wild Plants

Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia Hirta

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin word for black-eyed Susan? While not edible like most plants we’ve featured, this medicinal herb is a butterfly favorite that is so easy to plant. It adds bountiful pops of sunny yellow to meadows and path sides. For the most part I’m covering plants that are both edible and medicinal, …

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Reed Grass – Phragmites SPP.: Roasted Marshmallow of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Reed Grass - Phragmites SPP.

In Chippewa,  abo’djigun meaning “something turned out or over”, reed grass has turned me over too. It changed my completely black-and-white thinking about herbicides. It’s hard to tell our native reed grass from the invasive European subspecies, and it may be hard to tell if a patch has been treated. It’s a tread with caution sort …

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Wild Basil – Clinopodium Vulgare: Cilantro of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Wild Basil - Clinopodium Vulgare

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for wild basil? This edible and medicinal native plant has been flying under-the-radar. Basil lovers, sorry, but it’s more of a cilantro tasting plant. Wild basil (clinopodium vulgare) is fairly common in cottage country, Ontario. You’ll find it along damp woods, trails and roadsides and even in meadows. It’s …

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