Eastern white cedar – Thuja occidentalis

In Anishinaabemowin, eastern white cedar is sometimes called Giizhik, and also gi’jikan’dug meaning cedar like, as it’s not a “true cedar”. One of the alternative names for Eastern white cedar is swamp cedar as it likes to grow in damp woods. Another name is Tree of Life, which the white-tailed deer and a multitude of […]

White birch – Betula papyrifera

In Chippewa, Wi’gwass’tig. White Birch is sometimes called Paper Birch or Canoe Birch after two of its many utilizations. Are you curious How the Birch Tree Got It’s Burns? Click that link for the Ojibwe legend. Then the caption on the photo to the left will make sense. Edible Uses The twigs and leaves make […]

Jewelweed – Impatiens capensis

If you know any words in our local language (Anishinaabemowin) for Jewelweed, please comment! Jewelweed is so named because of the way the dew beads on it. Sometimes its called Wild Touch-me-not and Snapweed, due to the ripe seedpods exploding when touched. Edible Uses The young shoots are edible, but should be double boiled as […]

Common mullein – Verbascum thapsus

In Anishinaabemowin, mullein is sometimes calledWaabooyaanibag (blanket leaf) Mullein’s folk names include but are not limited to flannel leaf (leaves stuffed in shoes for warmth), tinder plant/torches/torch-wort, candle wick (dried stems used to be dipped in wax to make candles), cow’s lungwort. It’s been called tobacco going off the physical resemblance. Wearing it is said […]

Common dandelion – Taraxacum officinale

In Chippewa, Dado’cabodji’bik meaning dadocabo (liquid or milk) odjibik (root) Dandelion’s folk names include but are not limited to blowball, lion’s tooth (leaf appearance), priest’s crown, milk witch, wild endive, piss-a-bed (diuretic effect) and canker-wort. Among many folk magic uses an infusion of dandelion is said to promote psychic powers. Edible Uses Dandelion, being so […]