Queen Anne’s-lace – Daucus Carota: Carrot of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Ojibwe, okaadaak means carrot, and Queen Anne’s-lace is literally a carrot. It’s another likely garden escapee, naturalized to Haliburton, and a surprisingly edible and medicinal wild plant. (If you’re not possibly pregnant, anyway!) Edible Uses of Queen Anne’s-lace The whole plant smells distinctly of carrot. But the edible roots are white instead of orange. …

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Pineapple-weed – Matricaria Discoidea: Wild Chamomile of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for pineappleweed? Also called wild chamomile, which is more alluring on the medicinal side of naming. I suppose pineapple triggers a thirst for learning about its edible qualities. I would rather have titled this one Wild Chamomile, but I’m using the common names as seen in our local guidebook Haliburton …

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Staghorn Sumac – Rhus Typhina: The Lemonade of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Ojibwe, baakwaanaatig, mainly referring to the berry, staghorn sumac is the “lemonadiest” and most vinegary of edible and medicinal shrubs. Staghorn sumac has been called the vinegar tree and the lemonade tree as its juice can be used as a substitute for vinegar or lemon juice. The “staghorn” part comes from the velvety branches …

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Common Mullein – Verbascum Thapsus: The Coziest of Foragable Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Anishinaabemowin, mullein is sometimes called Waabooyaanibag (blanket leaf). Its uses are blanketly more medicinal than edible. But you can eat the delicate yellow flowers too! Mullein’s folk names include but are not limited to flannel leaf (leaves stuffed in shoes for warmth), tinder plant/torches/torch-wort, candlewick (dried stems used to be dipped in wax to …

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