Fire Cherry – Prunus Pensylvanica: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Bird Cherry of Wild Plants

Fire Cherry - Prunus Pensylvanica

We’ve covered almost every native cherry in Ontario and this fire cherry, also called bird cherry for one, is no exception to the fact prunus spp. are fantastic for birds and other wildlife. And not just jam! Pin cherry / Fire cherry (prunus pensylvanica) was common along roadsides, woodland slopes, lake banks, and stream banks …

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Eastern Hemlock – Tsuga Canadensis: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Porcupine Tree of Wild Plants

Eastern Hemlock - Tsuga Canadensis

In Chippewa, gaga’gimie, eastern hemlock is also called gaagaagiwanzh meaning “porcupine, his tree“. It’s a tree beneficial to countless wildlife with many edible, medicinal and craft uses. Eastern hemlock (tsuga canadensis) can be found in moist hardwood forests. I haven’t seen any on the 1 or the 100 acre I frequent, but I know people …

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Cinquefoils – Potentilla SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Mock Strawberries of Wild Plants

Cinquefoils - Potentilla SPP.

In Ojibwe, tcode’ imînaga’ wûnj meaning “like a strawberry” is a name for one of the cinquefoils. You can find at least seven species in our area of Central Ontario, with varying levels of edibility and medicinal quality. Around the world the most popular cinquefoils are tormentil and silverweed, neither of which are in Haliburton, Ontario. …

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Basswood – Tilia Americana: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Bee Tree of Wild Plants

Basswood - Tilia americana

In Chippewa, wigub’imij, basswood is also called bee-tree, lime-tree, and linden*. It’s an amazing woodcarving material, and those familiar with just that aspect might be surprised at basswood’s edible and medicinal qualities! Plus, bees! *It’s not the same tree as European Linden but the uses are mirrored. Bee lovers, hear, hear – Basswood blooms are …

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