Sweet Cicely – Osmorhiza SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Black Licorice of Wild Plants

Sweet cicely – Osmorhiza SPP.

In Chippewa, osaga’tigom meaning tangled branches, edible and medicinal sweet cicely (osmorhiza claytonii) and its close relations have an anise like scent. Wooly AKA hairy sweet cicely (osmorhiza claytonii) is the only osmorhiza listed in Haliburton Flora. It’s fairly common on bush roads and trails and in thin deciduous woods. I tend to find it …

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Clubmosses – Lycopodium SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Not Really a Moss of Wild Plants

Clubmosses - Lycopodium SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Not Really a Moss of Wild Plants

In Haliburton Flora, there are 9 clubmosses (lycopodium spp.) listed. Although, since that survey was taken most of them have been reclassified. Genus flipping aside, by narrowest circumscription just 2 of these are lycopods hereabouts, and 4 Ontario-wide. Clubmoss/lycopodium species are vascular plants often referred to as fern allies, closely related to ferns and plants …

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Elms – Ulmus SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Slippery Bark of Wild Plants

Elms - Ulmus SPP.

In Chippewa, gawa’komic, slippery elm is the medicinal star of the elms (ulmus spp.) native to Ontario. It’s also most popular local/Haliburton elm for foraging. But elm is at risk due to Dutch elm disease. Around cottage country Ontario there are three main native elm (ulmus spp.) trees. The most common is American/white elm (ulmus americana) …

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Avens – Geum SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Chocolate Root of Wild Plants

Avens - Geum SPP.

In Ojibwe, wica’wasa’konek meaning “yellow light” is one word for an avens, specifically large-leaved avens. Our chocolatey title is after the edible usage of the purple avens. We’ve got many geum spp. in Ontario, Canada! Avens (geum spp.) are in the rose family, closely related to cinquefoils and strawberries. In milder climates they are evergreen. Our …

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Stinging Nettle – Urtica Dioica: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Misunderstood Prickly Wild Plant

Stinging Nettle - Urtica Dioica

In Chippewa, bepadji’ckanakiz’it ma’zana’tig, stinging nettle tends to make a bad impression on first meeting, as the name suggests. But there’s way more to this needled edible and medicinal plant. The Chippewa name given refers specifically to the slender leaf subsp. The sting never lasts long for me, but I’ve heard of it lasting for days …

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White Ash – Fraxinus Americana: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Crafty Tree of Wild Plants

White Ash - Fraxinus Americana

In Chippewa, a’gimak’, white ash is a useful tree to know. In fact, it’s one of the top five trees Caleb Kinew Nini Musgrave @canadianbushcraft recommends knowing in our area. The other four being birch, cedar, spruce and basswood. The “white” refers to the pale underside of leaves, twigs, and bark, although it’s really more …

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