Heal-All – Prunella Vulgaris: Another Woundwort of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Heal-All - Prunella Vulgaris: Another Woundwort of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, name’wuskons, selfheal or heal-all is another edible and medicinal wild plant from the mint family. It doesn’t really heal-all, but it’s still a well rounded astringent plant with many uses. We have a mix of European and native selfheal in Ontario. Common around Haliburton, you’re most likely to find it in your lawn. …

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Common Fleabane – Erigeron Philadelphicus: Early Old Man of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Common Fleabane – Erigeron philadelphicus

Does anyone have a Anishinaabemowin word for common fleabane? These edible and medicinal fleabane are smaller daisies, that bloom earliest of daisies here, and they are quickly raggedly looking. From all that you can probably figure out why they’re called eri (early) and geron (old man) in greek. Around Haliburton, we have common fleabane, rough daisy …

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Serviceberry – Amelanchier SPP.: Early Bloomer of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Serviceberry - Amelanchier SPP.

In Chippewa, guzigwa’kominaga’wunj, referring to the shad fish spawning when the serviceberry blooms. The English name serviceberry has origins related to when one can finally have funeral services/burial for winters dead. They’re also called juneberries even though you’ll be waiting until the end of June or later for ripe berries. Here around Haliburton, Ontario you’ll …

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Evening Primrose – Oenothera Biennis: Midnight Oil of Foraged Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Evening primrose - Oenothera biennis

If anyone knows an Anishinaabemowin word for evening primrose, please comment! While not a true “primrose”, common evening primrose is truly amazing. You might have heard of evening primrose oil as a medicinal supplement, but this foraged wild plant is also amazingly edible! The flowers open at dusk hence the “evening”. Observe them and you’ll …

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