American Wintergreen – Gaultheria Procumbens: Snowberry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

American Wintergreen - Gaultheria Procumbens

In Chippewa, wini’sibugons’  meaning “dirty leaf”, American wintergreen is often called Eastern tea berry now. It’s edible and medicinal, but you have to mind the amount you use because the oil is toxic if overdosed. Similar to Aspirin, just a tsp of pure wintergreen oil is the equivalent of 21 and a half adult aspirins. American …

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Prickly Gooseberry – Ribes Cynosbati: Spiky Berry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Prickly Gooseberry - Ribes Cynosbati

In Chippewa,  micidji’minaga’wunj meaning “fuzzy fruit”, prickly gooseberry is a fuzzy wild currant. Spiky is more apt. Despite the soft flexible spikes on the fruit, it’s an edible and medicinal wild plant. And native to Ontario. There are many ribes spp. to feature from Ontario. A couple are gooseberries. Prickly gooseberry (ribes cynosbati) is the common …

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Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia Hirta: Easily-sown of Medicinal Wild Plants

Black-eyed Susan - Rudbeckia Hirta

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin word for black-eyed Susan? While not edible like most plants we’ve featured, this medicinal herb is a butterfly favorite that is so easy to plant. It adds bountiful pops of sunny yellow to meadows and path sides. For the most part I’m covering plants that are both edible and medicinal, …

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Mouse-ear Chickweeds – Cerastium SPP.: Furries of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Mouse-ear Chickweeds - Cerastium SPP.

In Chippewa,  wi’nibidja’bibaga’no meaning “toothplant”, refers to the European stellaria spp. But the one we’re talking about here is the cerastium spp., known as mouse-ear chickweeds. They’re almost as edible, furriness aside, but not as medicinal as the stellaria species. It’s important to note the hairless “common chickweed” (stellaria media) is a rare nonnative in the …

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Arrowheads – Sagittaria SPP.: Marsh Potato of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Arrowhead - Sagittaria SPP.

In Chippewa,  muj’ota’buk meaning “moose leaf”, arrowhead is an edible and medicinal plant in the humans case as well as moose. Not to be confused with arrowroot, which you can find at health food stores, you’ll find arrowhead in the marsh instead. Usually surrounded by cattail and the like, arrowhead (sagittaria SPP.) is a common aquatic …

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Canada Plum – Prunus Nigra: Scorned of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Canada plum – Prunus nigra

In Ojibwe, bagesaanaatig means plum tree. This edible and medicinal plum tree used to be widespread throughout Ontario. The stones were dropped along trails and around villages, wrapping the world in a plum thicket. But now Canada plum is uncommon here, which is surprising as wildlife loves to gobble up the fruit, so you’d think it …

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