Coneflowers – Echinacea SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Trendiest of Wild Plants

Coneflowers - Echinacea SPP.

In Chippewa,  gi’zuswe’bigwa’is meaning “it is scattering”, who hasn’t heard of coneflowers AKA echinacea? It’s one of the biggest fads in herbal medicine in recent decades. But are the claims about echinacea legit or overblown hype? Friend or fad? I’ll admit I’ve taken echinacea at the first sign of sniffles before. It’s one of if …

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Giant Hyssops – Agastache SPP.: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Hummingbird Mint of Wild Plants

Giant Hyssops - Agastache SPP.

In Chippewa, weza’wunuckwuk meaning “yellow plant”, referring to yellow giant hyssop, we have a few native agastache in Ontario. Rarely seen in the wild, they are a popular addition to pollinator gardens and they also have edible and medicinal uses for humans! Giant hyssops (agastache SPP.) are absent from Haliburton Flora although a few are native …

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The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 2: Ladies and Pearly Everlastings

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 2: Ladies and Pearly Everlastings

Dear Wood Folk, In 4 days our featured edible and medicinal plant will be pearly everlasting, which we’ll then go into the human uses for. But I thought it fitting to feature it as today’s pollinator host plant in our second such diary, with one of my favourite local butterflies. I rarely get the chance …

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Black Cherry – Prunus Serotina: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Cherry Cough Drop of Wild Plants

Black cherry – Prunus serotina

In Chippewa, ikwe’mic, black cherry while perhaps the least palatable of our cherries is still a bouncin’ edible and medicinal tree. I absolutely love making stuff with it too! The scent of the sawdust – yum! Black cherry is also called rum cherry because settlers blended the fruit with rum or brandy and called the …

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