The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 13: Silvery Blue and Lupine

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 13: Silvery Blue and Lupine

Dear Wood Folk, Silvery blue (glaucopsyche lygdamus) butterflies are easily mistaken for similarly blue azures, who were featured in our diaries earlier this year. I almost included the silvery blue caterpillar (below in this feature) in the azure diary by mistake! The slivery blue are easier to find with their wings spread open than azures. …

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Wood Nettle – Laportea Canadensis: Edible & Medicinal Uses of the Nettliest of Wild Plants

Wood Nettle - Laportea Canadensis

Wood nettle (laportea canadensis) is the most common native nettle in Ontario, and like the introduced stinging nettle it’s edible and medicinal. In fact, wood nettle is considered to be the favoured of the two. Wood nettle (laportea canadensis) is common in open moist woods, low damp areas and wet swamps. I found a great …

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The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 11: Coral Hairstreaks and Cherries

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 11: Coral Hairstreaks and Cherries

Dear Wood Folk, Hairstreaks (subfamily Theclinae) are distinct looking tiny butterflies that usually have a small protruding “hair” at the end of their tail. Today we’re focusing on the coral hairstreak (satyrium titus) and its very cherry host plants, but we’ll also give a brief summary of the rest of Ontario’s hairstreaks and the various …

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The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 10: Violets for Greater Fritillaries

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 10: Violets for Greater Fritillaries

Dear Wood Folk, Around cottage country, Ontario we have numerous fritillary butterflies. From a distance these bright orange butterflies are sometimes mistaken for monarchs. Fritillary can be a hard word to retain; at least it was for me. (Frit frit frit.. (h)illary. Repeat 10 times. Maybe picture a Hillary you know “freaking lit”.) Our most …

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