Queen Anne’s-lace – Daucus Carota: Carrot of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Ojibwe, okaadaak means carrot, and Queen Anne’s-lace is literally a carrot. It’s another likely garden escapee, naturalized to Haliburton, and a surprisingly edible and medicinal wild plant. (If you’re not possibly pregnant, anyway!) Edible Uses of Queen Anne’s-lace The whole plant smells distinctly of carrot. But the edible roots are white instead of orange. […]

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Common Fleabane – Erigeron Philadelphicus: Early Old Man of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have a Anishinaabemowin word for common fleabane? These edible and medicinal fleabane are smaller daisies, that bloom earliest of daisies here, and they are quickly raggedly looking. From all that you can probably figure out why they’re called eri (early) and geron (old man) in greek. Around Haliburton, we have common fleabane, rough daisy […]

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Wild Parsnip – Pastinaca Sativa: Sweetest of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for parsnip? There isn’t a traditional word because this plant is an invasive settler plant. Edible and medicinal carrot/parsley family plants are notorious on the internet. Their relation giant hogweed is especially villainized. My library of herbal books tends to focus on cow parsnip, and even then, these parsnip […]

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Common Burdock – Arctium Minus: An Edible & Medicinal Wild Plant That’ll Stick With You

In Chippewa, wiisagibag meaning bitter leaf, also wiisagijiibik meaning bitter taproot and gi’ masan meaning big stickers. Common burdock is an edible and medicinal wild plant that will stick with you. It’s a favorite of mine! Burdock’s folk names are predominately along the lines of burr-this or that-burr, like burrseed for instance. Which is questionable […]

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Common Mullein – Verbascum Thapsus: The Coziest of Foragable Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Anishinaabemowin, mullein is sometimes calledWaabooyaanibag (blanket leaf). Its uses are blanketly more medicinal than edible. But you can eat the delicate yellow flowers too! Mullein’s folk names include but are not limited to flannel leaf (leaves stuffed in shoes for warmth), tinder plant/torches/torch-wort, candlewick (dried stems used to be dipped in wax to make […]

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