Pearly Everlasting – Anaphalis Margaritacea: Moonshine of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Pearly Everlasting - Anaphalis Margaritacea

In Chippewa, wa’bigwun meaning “flowers”, pearly everlasting is a unique looking edible and medicinal plant. While not used much these days for food or medicine, it’s still a hit for American Lady butterflies and florists alike. Pearly everlasting (anaphalis margaritacea) is especially common along roadsides and damp ditches. It’s named for its pearly colored flower …

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The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 2: Ladies and Pearly Everlastings

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 3, Chapter 2: Ladies and Pearly Everlastings

Dear Wood Folk, In 4 days our featured edible and medicinal plant will be pearly everlasting, which we’ll then go into the human uses for. But I thought it fitting to feature it as today’s pollinator host plant in our second such diary, with one of my favourite local butterflies. I rarely get the chance …

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Alternate-leaved Dogwood – Cornus Alternifolia: Bee Tree of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Alternate-leaved Dogwood - Cornus Alternifolia

In Chippewa,  muj’omij meaning “moose plant”, alternate-leaved dogwood is one of our many cornus spp. Dogwoods aren’t just edible and medicinal, nor just for the moose. They are one of the main allies of our native bees. Alternate-leaved dogwood (cornus alternifolia) is common in central Ontario, especially around forest edges. Its relation red osier dogwood (cornus …

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Wood Sorrel – Oxalis SPP.: Sourgrass of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Wood Sorrel - Oxalis SPP.

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for wood sorrel (oxalis spp.)? Like red osier berries, wood sorrel is a sour edible to spice up your culinary adventures. It’s almost as easy of an edible and medicinal wild plant to find as dandelion. We have at least two fairly common sorrels. Firstly, mountain wood-sorrel (oxalis montana), …

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Wild Lily-Of-The-Valley – Maianthemum Canadense: Mayflower of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Wild Lily-Of-The-Valley - Maianthemum Canadense

In Ojibwe, agoñgosî’ mînûn meaning chipmunk berries, wild lily-of-the-valley is not a lily. Wild lily-of-the-valley is of the Asparagaceae family (as of 2016). It’s an edible and medicinal plant, but be sure not to confuse it with true lily-of-the-valley! Another lookalike to be ware of is 3-leaved Solomon’s seal. Chipmunks are cute, but the alternative name …

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Goldenrod – Solidago SPP.: Sun Medicine of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Goldenrod - Solidago SPP.

In Chippewa, gi’ziso’muki’ki, goldenrod is a sunny medicinal and edible wild plant. In the past, it was falsely blamed for hayfever allergies, which are actually caused by ragweed. It’s really a medicine to treat allergies! Latin solidare means to join or make whole, and when you come upon the medicinal tags below you’ll see why …

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