Catnip – Nepeta Cataria: Nightcap of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, gajugens’ibug meaning “little-cat leaf”, catnip isn’t native to Ontario, but at least it’s not aggressive. It’s a surprisingly useful edible and medicinal plant, if you’re not pregnant. And whether or not you’re a cat. Catnip (nepeta cataria) is uncommon around Haliburton, but I find it around old farmsteads. It may also show up …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Blue Vervain – Verbena Hastata: Tranq of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin word for blue vervain? This edible and medicinal plant is highly valued for its tranquilizing effect on the nervous system. Ontario’s native blue vervains are pollinator friendly beauties. Finding blue vervain in the wild around Haliburton was uncommon when Haliburton Flora was compiled, but I have seen numerous small wild …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Chokecherry – Prunus Virginiana: Sour Cherry of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, a’sisuwe’minaga’wunj, chokecherries are one of our most commonly found edible and medicinal berry shrubs. The “choke” is a reference to how sour they are. Pucker up! Common around Haliburton and in Algonquin park too, chokecherry dots the roadsides, stream edges and fencerows. They may be the most widespread tree in North America. Up …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Coltsfoot – Tussilago Farfara: Salt of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for coltsfoot? Coltsfoot is another settler import to North America with a longstanding edible and medicinal history. But keep reading because things have gotten complicated due to health concerns about one of the constituents. Coltsfoot has gone out of vogue for a couple reasons. Firstly, antihistamines and new cough …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Ghost Pipe – Monotropa Uniflora: That’s Not a Mushroom of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone know an Anishinaabemowin name for ghost pipe? Or an indigenous owned site that tells its story? An herb most will mistake for a mushroom, this pale wildflower has forgone photosynthesis and can often be found in the darkest woods. It’s one of the many edible and medicinal plants that should probably be left …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Blue Cohosh – Caulophyllum Thalictroides: Woman’s Ally of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Chippewa, be’cigodji’biguk meaning one root, blue cohosh is similar to its name twin black cohosh, but from a whole other genus of plants. They aren’t look-a-likes, but their medicinal uses are similar. “Cohosh” is from an Algonquin word related to pregnancy/women. Both cohoshes are species at risk of overharvest. Presently, motherwort is a more sustainable choice …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!