In Chippewa, Dado’cabodji’bik meaning dadocabo (liquid or milk) odjibik (root)

Dandelion’s folk names include but are not limited to blowball, lion’s tooth (leaf appearance), priest’s crown, milk witch, wild endive, piss-a-bed (diuretic effect) and cankerwort. Among many folk magic uses an infusion of dandelion is said to promote psychic powers.

Common Dandelion
Common Dandelion

EDIBLE USES

A nutritious addition to raw salad (leaves least bitter before flowering)
Dandelion wine (flowers)
Dandelion jelly (flowers)
Fritters (battered flowers), sautés, etc.
Used like carrots in stews et al or for pickling (tender roots)
Coffee substitute that tastes nothing like coffee (dried, powdered roots, harvested late fall; oft combined with roasted acorn and roasted rye in equal pts)
Tea (combines well with chicory or burdock root)

Rich in vitamins a, b, c, riboflavin

MEDICINAL USES

Dandelion is said to support:

Liver
Gallbladder
Kidney and urinary tract
Blood
Skin

Medicinal tags include Cool and Moist, Alterative, Bitters, Diuretics, Lithotriptic, Laxative, Circulatory, Digestive, Urinary, Lymphatic. See Medicinal tag key for more information.

Common usage includes the rhizome and roots as a bitter tonic and mild laxative.

OTHER USES

Compost – Here’s an article on using herbs incl. dandelion in compost @http://www.pennywoodward.com.au/compost-with-a-dash-of-herbs/.

The flower can be used to produce a yellow dye, the roots magenta.

GROWING

Easy!

Seeds can be sown directly in the fall for early-spring greens. You can mimic this overwintering by winter sowing. While they’ll grow in poor soil, moist and rich alkaline soil is favored, with full sun. They also do well in raised beds. Individual plants can live up to (estimated) 13 years!

WARNINGS

Some people are allergic to the milky latex of dandelion.

There are lookalikes.

REFERENCES

wiki/Taraxacum_officinale
Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs (Llewellyn’s Sourcebook Series) (Cunningham’s Encyclopedia Series)
Native Plants, Native Healing: Traditional Muskagee Way
The Yoga of Herbs: An Ayurvedic Guide to Herbal Medicine
How Indians Use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine and Crafts
Edible and Medicinal Plants of Canada
Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use
Indian Herbalogy of North America: The Definitive Guide to Native Medicinal Plants and Their Uses