Orange Day-Lily – Hemerocallis Fulva: Ditch Spud of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for orange day-lily? Like many plants called “lily”, it isn’t a true lily. The flowers are just lily-like. The “day” part comes from each bloom only lasting a day. It’s a non-native edible and medicinal plant you can just gobble up if you like. In Haliburton, we have both …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

White Water-Lily – Nymphaea Odorata: Lotus of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an eastern Anishinaabe name for white water lily? One of the central names is odite’abug wabi’gwun. White water-lily is one of our stand out edible and medicinal aquatic plants. The flower itself is widely recognizable – a lotus. Around Haliburton we have white water-lily (nymphaea odorata) and the yellow ones you spot …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Wood Sorrel – Oxalis SPP.: Sourgrass of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for wood sorrel (oxalis spp.)? Like red osier berries, wood sorrel is a sour edible to spice up your culinary adventures. It’s almost as easy of an edible and medicinal wild plant to find as dandelion. We have at least two fairly common sorrels. Firstly, mountain wood-sorrel (oxalis montana), …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Wild Lily-Of-The-Valley – Maianthemum Canadense: Mayflower of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

In Ojibwe, agoñgosî’ mînûn meaning chipmunk berries, wild lily-of-the-valley is not a lily. Wild lily-of-the-valley is of the Asparagaceae family (as of 2016). It’s an edible and medicinal plant, but be sure not to confuse it with true lily-of-the-valley! Another lookalike to be ware of is 3-leaved Solomon’s seal. Chipmunks are cute, but the alternative name …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

The Wood Folk Diaries: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Meet the Waxwings, Bouquet Givers

Dear Wood Folk, The name “waxwing” comes from a waxy red secretion found on the tips of the secondary feathers of some cedar waxwings. In the 1960s, orange became all the rage, which was a great mystery at first. It turns out the color change came from waxwings eating the berries of a non-native species …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!

Sow Thistle – Sonchus SPP.: Rabbit-food of Edible & Medicinal Wild Plants

Does anyone have an Anishinaabemowin word for sow thistle (sonchus spp.)? Not a true thistle and also non-native here, and sometimes mistakenly called milk thistle, sow thistles are another edible and medicinal plant to gobble up or feed to the pigs. I rarely see sow thistles here, but noted plants include field sow-thistle (sonchus arvensis), …

Please Like, Comment, Share! We'd love to hear your stories and knowledge! Thank you!